We Have the Power!

This website/blog is a place to share about responsible consumerism. I expect anyone that has found this page is familiar with the phrase, “Buy Local.” But how do you “Buy Local,” when almost everything you see on the shelves is made in China? Another tough concept to bring to practice is “Support Sustainability.” But what is sustainability? Most want to do the “Green” thing, but with corporate advertising mushing up the definitions and seriously diminishing and marginalizing what Green means, how does the typical consumer know what to buy, and does it matter?

It is my intention to share with you, kind reader, some what I’ve learned about responsible consumption and what choices I make to help create a better future for our progeny. In future posts I will share with you strategies for taking confusion from the choices. The most influence each of us has on the society we live in, and the future for our children, is what we buy, or even more importantly, what we refuse to buy. I trust that others will share as well and cumulatively we can maximize our impact.

An important first step is recognizing how our sense of being manipulated in a way that we are always “in need.” I “need” a new pair of shoes , or whatever. We don’t need shoes, in reality. There are BILLIONS of human being walking the earth now, barefooted. This is done to us through the media and advertising to a point that we don’t see it, like the air we breathe.

A helpful first step to responsible consumerism is differentiating between need and want.

It’s perfectly human and right for our social economy that you get those new shoes you want. Especially when you buy shoes (or whatever) made in the USA and with sustainably sourced materials. That way you help create jobs for your neighbors and abundance and health for all. And that, dear friend, is the essence of being a Responsible Consumer. We have little choice over our need for water, food and shelter, but when it comes to fulfilling desires, choosing to do so with local or Fair Trade products, made from sustainably produced materials feels good. I want to help people become more aware and empowered consumers because I know we can change the world.

Recent Posts

Music is a Sustainable Product

If we are all buying the future with every purchase, I’m doing my best to purchase a future filled with live music. A significant portion of my earnings are directed towards tickets for musical events. The latest being a trip to Denver, (Commerce City) for a Phish 3 day run.

This trip wouldn’t be a good example of well directed purchasing for me. Primarily because of my dependence on air travel to get there and back. I did research rail availability. While I accept working around the extended time requirements of current rail travel, when I realized it would also cost me significantly more each way, it became beyond my ability to afford to “do the right thing.”

Cultural and sporting events can be great examples of sustainable economic activity as the environmental impacts are limited and can be ameliorated. This weekend’s show at Dick’s Sporting Good’s Park wasn’t a good example of a “sustainable” event though. For one, Public Transportation access was very limited and required an extensive walk for the last leg. The venue did have a $15 per car parking fee, (per car to foster car pooling according to the promoters). Many of the venues I’m familiar with have very good Public Transportation access. Madison Square Garden and The Barclay Center are both built on top of transportation hubs, a brilliant act of city planning for efficiency and sustainability.

We are still using way too much non recyclable and indestructible packaging, and this was evident at Dick’s as well. It is great to see that there were a vegan food truck as well as a truck that served only grass fed meat products.

It’s the music we were there to experience and the reason for purchasing our tickets. The venue is a multi-purpose outdoor facility, so I would imagine that it’s ecological impact would be minimal, especially when distributed over it’s lifespan. The production equipment has a material impact, but all of it is used multiple times and is capable of being recycled at end of life. The music is in the moment, produced from the calories and muscle movements of the musicians.

  1. Don’t buy Plastic, Buy Plastic Leave a reply
  2. Is anything made in the USA, anymore? Leave a reply